Haute topic: Clothing should have labels models shouldnt

Outrage erupted last week when Calvin Klein launched a campaign with size 10 model Myla Dalbesio, whom the public deemed.


Outrage erupted last week when Calvin Klein launched a campaign with size 10 model Myla Dalbesio, whom the public deemed not so plus-size. The thing is, CK never said she was. They simply put a not-stick-thin model in an ad as if it were a regular occurrence.

It was the public who felt the need to make grand proclamations about her size.

Calvin Klein did everything right. They didnt treat her like a marketing opportunity or a token real woman. (What does that even mean? Are thin women not real?) Most brands feel the need to smugly pat themselves on the back and trumpet their so-called forward thinking to the world when they use a model over size 2.

Sure, Calvin Kleins campaigns could use even more size diversity, but thats a different issue. As Coco Rocha told the Huffington Post: Petite, short, high fashion, runway it should all just be one genre, its just a model.

We need to resist the urge to categorize and label women and their bodies. Its ironic, and harmful, that the sizing for plus-size models is just as stringent as it is for regular models. Lets just let women be women and not define them by their shape or measurements.

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