Solo trivia stiffs

WHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE, for Sony PlayStation, $60. Rating: NN Rating: NNNNNWHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE, for.


WHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE, for Sony PlayStation, $60. Rating: NN Rating: NNNNN


WHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE, for Sony PlayStation, $60. Rating: NNWhat in the book or film world would be called a rush release, PlayStation’s version of the wildly popular, once cute and now annoying game show Who Wants To Be A Millionaire is already into its second edition.

The home version is remarkably similar to the real thing. There are multiple-choice questions with four possible answers. Contestants — up to two can play at a time — have 60 seconds to decide.

All three lifelines are available. An Internet poll was done for the “ask the audience” option, and there’s even a fake phone call if you need to consult a friend.

Endless pauses create high drama, or at least a reasonable facsimile, as does the show’s moody music. And, of course, there’s Regis, smarmy as ever and irritating enough to make you want to permanently mute the TV with a hatchet.

The major difference, of course, is the payoff. Every single person who saw the game on my coffee table this weekend said exactly the same thing: “So, do you actually get the money?” Ah, no. Sadly, there is no oversized novelty cheque.

Which leads us to the main problem with the game. What’s the point? Sure, the questions are tough, but they repeat fairly frequently, and without a serious cash payout, why would you want to sit around and read questions off a TV screen?

Trivia games, whether played in the pub or around the table at the cottage, are social events. Half the fun of Trivial Pursuit is debating with pals and crushing your opponents.

Since this game is a largely solitary endeavor and Reeg isn’t going to fork over, it’s unlikely you’ll play it more than a couple of times.

mattg@nowtoronto.comWHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE, for Sony PlayStation, $60. Rating: NNWhat in the book or film world would be called a rush release, PlayStation’s version of the wildly popular, once cute and now annoying game show Who Wants To Be A Millionaire is already into its second edition.

The home version is remarkably similar to the real thing. There are multiple-choice questions with four possible answers. Contestants — up to two can play at a time — have 60 seconds to decide.

All three lifelines are available. An Internet poll was done for the “ask the audience” option, and there’s even a fake phone call if you need to consult a friend.

Endless pauses create high drama, or at least a reasonable facsimile, as does the show’s moody music. And, of course, there’s Regis, smarmy as ever and irritating enough to make you want to permanently mute the TV with a hatchet.

The major difference, of course, is the payoff. Every single person who saw the game on my coffee table this weekend said exactly the same thing: “So, do you actually get the money?” Ah, no. Sadly, there is no oversized novelty cheque.

Which leads us to the main problem with the game. What’s the point? Sure, the questions are tough, but they repeat fairly frequently, and without a serious cash payout, why would you want to sit around and read questions off a TV screen?

Trivia games, whether played in the pub or around the table at the cottage, are social events. Half the fun of Trivial Pursuit is debating with pals and crushing your opponents.

Since this game is a largely solitary endeavor and Reeg isn’t going to fork over, it’s unlikely you’ll play it more than a couple of times.

mattg@nowtoronto.com

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