Rocks a shock

Rating: NNNNNROCKS AT WHISKEY TRENCH (Alanis Obomsawin, 2000) chronicles one of the most brutal chapters of the Kahnawake crisis of.


Rating: NNNNN


ROCKS AT WHISKEY TRENCH (Alanis Obomsawin, 2000) chronicles one of the most brutal chapters of the Kahnawake crisis of 1990. On August 28, a group of Mohawk women, children and elders left Kahnawake, fearing the army was moving in. But their cars hit a wall of hate. Dozens of white Quebecers lined the road and threw hundreds of rocks at the cars. Some people broke windshields, some cheered, one screamed, “God damn you dirty Indian savages.” The police watched it happen. Abenaki filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin is one of Canada’s best-known documentarians, and she shot reams of footage in Kahnawake during the long, fraught summer of 1990. This is the fourth film drawn from that time. If the images and interviews all serve to underline the same stark point, it’s a point worth making – the violence that built this country isn’t over yet. Not nearly. Obomsawin’s film premieres during the Aboriginal Voices Festival. NNN (June 21, John Spotton)

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