Weekend Movies: Now You See Me 2, Warcraft, Maggie’s Plan and more

A quick scan of new releases in theatres. Plus what to watch right now on Netflix.


>>> Maggie’s Plan stars Greta Gerwig as college administrator Maggie, who hits up an old friend (Travis Fimmel) for sperm only to find herself pregnant after suddenly hooking up with married prof John (Ethan Hawke). Three years later we catch up with her, now living with daughter Lily and John, an impossibly self-absorbed writer whose interest in her is directly proportional to her ability to gush over his still-not-finished novel. (See full review). 

Opens June 10. See listing

Rating: NNNN


The Conjuring 2 is a sequel to the horror film about ghostbusters Lorraine and Ed Warren (Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson). This time it’s business as usual as Ed and Lorraine pack up and head to a modest council flat in Enfield, England, where a single mother’s (Frances O’Connor) children are witnessing more moving furniture than at an Ikea warehouse. (See full review). 

Opens June 10. See listing

Rating: NN


Now You See Me 2 replaces the absent Isla Fisher with the much more invested Lizzy Caplan and gives crafty stage magicians the Horsemen (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Dave Franco) a new enemy in Daniel Radcliffe’s string-pulling techno-wizard. The plot riffs on Ocean’s 12, with our heroes forced to pull an impossible heist at the behest of the new baddie, but that’s just an excuse for more of the same: antic chases and last-minute escapes, impossible card tricks, unexpected reversals of allegiance and a big finale that makes no sense whatsoever but sure does have a lot of strobe lights. (See full review). 

Opens June 10. See listing

Rating: NNN


Warcraft is a big-screen spinoff of the wildly popular World Of Warcraft video game. It’s a tale of the war between the humans of Azeroth and an army of brutal Orcs who’ve invaded from another world. (See full review). 

Opens June 10. See listing

Rating: NN


Khoya opens with a startling succession of shots of Rupak Ginn’s Roger, wearing a perpetually lost look. He gazes at a wintry Toronto skyline, takes off from Pearson Airport, lands and finally squeezes through the kind of bustling passenger train that signifies he’s in the thick of it in India. In just a few moments, that beautiful sequence captures the sense of displacement this reverse immigration tale is about. (See full review). 

Opens June 10. See listing

Rating: NN


The American Dreamer is a 1971 documentary that follows Dennis Hopper around while he pontificates about sex, fame and capitalism. Well, it’s mostly a documentary co-directors Schiller and Carson made their film in close collaboration with their subject, with whom they share writing credits. (See full review). 

Opens June 10. See listing

Rating: NN


>>> Koneline: Our Land Beautiful is a visually stunning documentary conveying the unique relationship of the Tahltan First Nation to their remote lands in British Columbia, now seriously threatened by mining interests. Director Wild shows immense respect for the Aboriginals trying to protect their land and traditions. And images of the pristine hills and waters contrast with the brutal degradation of the territory at the hands of corporations. But this is not a pic from the Nettie Wild we know from more journalistic films like A Place Called Chiapas, which tends to tell the audience who to root for. (See full review). 

Opens June 10. See listing

Rating: NNNNN


>>> Vita Activa: The Spirit Of Hannah Arendt almost solves the problem of dealing with Arendt’s difficult ideas in a visual medium – but not quite. The visuals – archival footage of Europe post-WWI to post-WWII and some of Arendt’s home movies – seem like filler, all the more so because the soundtrack seems not to fit. (See full review). 

Opens June 10. See listing

Rating: NNNN


Available now on Netflix


The Diary Of A Teenage Girl takes place in 1976 San Francisco, where 17-year-old Minnie Goetz (Bel Powley) is struggling with exactly that, as well as a powerful sexual attraction to her mother’s boyfriend (Alexander Skarsgård) that cannot possibly end well – though both of them are doing their best to avoid talking about it. (See full review). 

Rating: NNNN

Available to watch here

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