Marmalade

Rating: NNNNNCulinary legend claims a frugal Scots grocer invented marmalade in the early 1800s after purchasing a supply of Seville.


Rating: NNNNN

Culinary legend claims a frugal Scots grocer invented marmalade in the early 1800s after purchasing a supply of Seville oranges that he was unable to sell because of their bitter taste. Not wanting to waste them, he chopped up the sour fruit — rind included — and created the popular breakfast spread. Not so. The slightly bitter jam whose name comes from the Portuguese word “marmelada” has been around for centuries in Mediterranean climes far from the Highlands.

RECIPE

This fruity recipe for Caribbean Chicken works best on the barbecue, but can be duplicated on the George Foreman indoor grill you got for Christmas. In a small saucepan, make a basting sauce by melting 1/3 cup of butter over low heat and stirring in 3 tablespoons lime juice, 1 teaspoon each dried thyme and salt, 1 crushed and minced garlic clove, 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard and a grinding of black pepper. Lightly sprinkle salt and pepper on 2 pounds of chicken legs (thighs attached). Place them skin side up on the grill — 4 to 5 inches above medium-hot coals if you’re using a barbecue — and baste with herbed butter frequently. Occasionally turn the chicken until it’s tender and the juices run clear when pricked with a fork. Meanwhile, combine 1/2 cup marmalade with 1 tablespoon each butter and lime juice, and heat mixture on medium-low until melted, stirring constantly. When the chicken is cooked, brush some of the marmalade sauce on each piece to glaze grill 1 minute, then turn the chicken, brush again and grill another minute. Serves two alongside island-stylee rice ‘n’ peas.

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