Letters to the editor: The premier is living in a fantasy world on COVID

Plus, enlightenment at the end of Omicron, seeing Canada through the eyes of immigrants and Toronto's changing music scene in reader mail this week


The closer to an election we get, the worse Ford gets

Re: Doug Ford comes out of hiding to tell Ontario to “brace for impact” (NOW Online, January 3).

At first when the Omicron variant struck I didn’t want to lose my gym time, the only hour of relaxation I had. I wondered how long it would take to allow for a reduction of this variant. But Ford was in charge and I thought that he should know what’s happening. Then when I saw the numbers before Christmas I expected a decision at any moment, but nothing.

What caught my attention was seeing Ford on TV getting his booster while ignoring that many people (like me) were looking unsuccessfully for an appointment. That was the moment a detonation went off in my head that said to me, “This guy is in Narnia.” Now schools and gyms have been closed. The closer to the election we get, the worse Ford gets. Maybe he should have been gone a while ago… ya know?

Gabriel AlfredoFrom NOWTORONTO.COM

Seeing the light at the end of COVID

Re It’s everything under the sun in 2022 by David Suzuki (NOW Online, January 5).

For many Canadians, David Suzuki is an integral part of thinking with purpose and of being continuously reminded
of the safety net that is the Canadian signature, and the one thing that sets us apart from all other countries.

So still under the dark shadow of COVID, we greet a new year. But with the solstice, increasing light has a subtle but profound effect on thinking hopefully. Enlightenment can be a powerful influence, especially now under the heavy labour of being compliant to medicine and science during a pandemic.

Peter MorrisFrom NOWTORONTO.COM

Expect more climate destruction in 2022

I am a father, musician and educator and I am deeply concerned with the onslaught of climate change. Our number one priority worldwide should be to act to remedy this extremely dangerous situation.

In 2021, heat domes, forest fires, floods and droughts made headlines around the world. Climatologists expect more records to be broken and more destruction in 2022. We need rapid, large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and a plan for a just transition that supports workers and communities in the necessary shift away from fossil fuels.

All levels of government must prevent tax dollars from creating incentives for climate pollution, by phasing out all subsidies and public financing for oil, gas and coal. Let’s focus on the health of the planet now.

Dave Clark Toronto

Canadians are tired of being tired

I’m tired. I’m tired of being scared. I’m tired of feeling like my future is being ripped away by the people I chose to elect. I’m tired of the lies and the greed. I’m tired of crying. I’m tired of being tired. Just do your jobs and protect our nature the way you promised you would. Act. Act now.

Carolyn CathcartFrom NOWTORONTO.COM

Learning about Canada through immigrant eyes

Re Andrew Phung’s terrific Run (NOW, January 6-12).

The CBC’s Gem is cranking out some spectacular TV. I love learning about Canada through the eyes of the immigrant experience.

Canada is a large country but we never really take the time to see what the other Canadian cultures are doing and how they live their lives in their particular cities. I’m also currently enjoying Son of a Critch. Good job Canadian television!

J. RobertsonFrom NOWTORONTO.COM

Unions and home concerts part of Toronto’s changing music scene

Re 5 bold predictions for Toronto’s music scene in 2022 (NOW Online, January 4).

Thanks to Richard Trapunski for this article. I’m a musician and it makes strong points about the changing music scene in Toronto and Canada.

About the “drive towards unionization”, have you heard of the UMAW (Union of Music and Allied Workers)? It’s based in the U.S., but striving to be international.

Also, how about the home concert scene? Even pre-pandemic, this was a good idea. Of course, one needs enough space, but a dozen engaged listeners can be all some artists need to thrive.

Fred SpekFrom NOWTORONTO.COM

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